The Australian Space Agency, in partnership with NASA, is working with Australia’s space industry to design and build an Aussie-made rover that will go to the Moon.

NASA will launch the rover in a future Artemis mission. The rover will support global space science and exploration goals. It will also demonstrate Australian innovations on the Moon.

 

What’s in the name?

Roo-ver is the name of our history-making rover. The Australian public chose the name, after a competition that saw more than 8,000 entries.

The chosen name was entered by Siwa from New South Wales who said:

“Our lunar rover deserves to be named after something iconically Australian, reflecting the Aussie spirit as we launch into this new endeavour. A kangaroo is part of the Australian Coat of Arms and it's time for Australian science to take the next leap all the way up into space.”

 

Roo-ver facts

Hover over, or click, the below questions to read the answers.

How big will Roo-ver be?

How big will Roo-ver be?

Roo-ver is expected to weigh around 20 kilograms. It will be roughly the size of a suitcase that you check in at the airport.

What will Roo-ver do?

What will Roo-ver do?

Roo-ver will be controlled from Earth and collect lunar soil, known as regolith.

The regolith will be taken to another piece of equipment where NASA will perform scientific experiments on it, including trying to extract oxygen.

Why do we want oxygen from the soil?

Why do we want oxygen from the soil?

Producing oxygen is a key step in setting-up a sustainable human presence on the Moon.

Oxygen is a key element of rocket fuel. Producing rocket fuel on the Moon would support future missions to Mars.

How will Roo-ver get to the Moon?

How will Roo-ver get to the Moon?

Roo-ver will travel to the Moon on a NASA rocket as part of a future Artemis mission.

NASA is flying the rover as recognition for the long-standing partnership between Australia and the United States in space. Australia is also a founding signatory of the Artemis Accords.

G'day Moon: Our boldest adventure yet

The Australian Space Agency’s campaign to promote our history-making lunar mission.

Why is NASA partnering with Australia in this mission?

Why is NASA partnering with Australia in this mission?

Australia is a world-leader in remote operations and autonomous systems on Earth. Much of that experience comes from our resources sector.

This expertise is extremely valuable for international missions.

Who is building Roo-ver?

Who is building Roo-ver?

Two Australian industry consortiums – AROSE and ELO2 – are currently working on early-stage rover concepts.

Stage Two will see either AROSE or ELO2 selected to design and build Roo-ver for its mission to the Moon.

Where is Roo-ver going to land on the Moon?

Where is Roo-ver going to land on the Moon?

At this stage, Roo-ver is likely to land in the South Pole region of the Moon.
 

How long will Roo-ver operate on the Moon?

How long will Roo-ver operate on the Moon?

Roo-ver is expected to operate for 14 Earth days. That’s only about half of one Moon day.

An illustration of Australia's rover on the moon

Why is Australia going to the Moon?

Space exploration has led to discoveries and technologies that improve our lives on Earth. This includes technologies that make us healthier, help us respond to climate change, increase productivity in critical industries, fast track technology development, keep us safe, and allows us to better understand our place in the universe.  

Going to the Moon also requires huge leaps forward in science and technology across multiple industries. From Manufacturing to Mining, to Health and Science, and critical technologies such as AI and Robotics – space exploration requires the skills and capabilities from all these areas.

By getting Australian industries involved in Australia’s first mission to the Moon, we can advance these industries, while also boosting our economy and generating jobs now and for the next generation.

Read more about why Australia is going to the Moon.

Our department recognises the First Peoples of this Nation and their ongoing cultural and spiritual connections to the lands, waters, seas, skies, and communities.

We Acknowledge First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Custodians and Lore Keepers of the oldest living culture and pay respects to their Elders past and present. We extend that respect to all First Nations Peoples.